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RAC Ontario Sections Bulletin for November 2, 2019

Paul Caccamo VA3PC
 

RAC Ontario Sections Bulletin for November 2, 2019

This is V__3____, Official Bulletin Station for Radio Amateurs of Canada, with this week's bulletin

NATIONAL / INTERNATIONAL NEWS

1. World Radiocommunication Conference-19 now underway in Egypt

WRC-19 is now underway in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt and is being held from Oct 28 to Nov 22, 2019.
Bryan Rawlings, VE3QN, the RAC Special Advisor at World Radiocommunication Conferences, will be
providing updates via the RAC website and social media on the issues and processes that ultimately
determine Amateur Radio frequencies around the world.
We will also be including a report on the proceedings and outcomes of WRC-19 in a future issue of
The Canadian Amateur magazine.
Social Media posts will use the hashtag #RACatWRC19.
-- rac website

ONTARIO SECTION NEWS

ITEMS OF INTEREST

2. Build a long-distance data network using ham radio and open source modems.

The IEEE magazine Spectrum reports on a new Amateur Radio digital mode, New Packet Radio (NPR)
The article says:   It took six years, but the result is New Packet Radio (NPR), which I chose
to publish open source under my call sign, F4HDK, as a nom de plume. It supports today’s de
facto universal standard of communication — IPV4 — and allows data to be transmitted up to
500 kilobits per second on the popular 70-centimeter UHF ham radio band.

Admittedly, 500 kb/s is not as fast as the megabits per second that flow through amateur networks
such as the European Hamnet or U.S. AREDN, which use gigahertz frequencies like those of Wi-Fi.
But it is still faster than the 1.2 kb/s normally used by AX.25 links, and the 70-cm band permits
longer-distance links even when obstructions prevent line-of-sight transmissions.

Read the full article at
https://spectrum.ieee.org/geek-life/hands-on/build-a-longdistance-data-network-using-ham-radio


NPR New Packet Radio
https://hackaday.io/project/164092-npr-new-packet-radio

-- thanks to F4HDK

3. Researchers transmit energy with a laser-in 'historic' power-beaming demonstration

For the first time, hundreds of watts of power were wirelessly transmitted hundreds of meters,
with an integrated system that ensured the safety of operators and bystanders.
On one end of the of the testing facility -- one of the largest test facilities for model ships
in the world -- the receiver was converting the laser energy to DC power, which an inverter was
turning into AC power to run lights, several laptops, and a coffeemaker that the organizers were
using to make coffee for the attendees.
Paul Jaffe, an electronics engineer with the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory has been
conducting space-based solar energy research for more than a decade. According to Jaffe, power
beaming could also make possible the transmission of power from solar-energy-collecting satellites
in space to the ground, wherever it's needed. Imagine using it to send power to locations that are
remote, hard to reach or lack infrastructure, he suggested.

see full article at https://hardware.slashdot.org/story/19/10/26/1441243/
researchers-transmit-energy-with-a-laser-in-historic-power-beaming-demonstration


-- thanks to Stephen, G7VFY for spotting this item

4. New 630-Meter Distance Record Claimed

Eric Tichansky, NO3M, and Roger Crofts, VK4YB, are claiming a new world distance record on 630 meters.
They worked each other on October 14 at 1032 UTC using JT9 mode. Tichansky said the contact represented
the culmination of 2 years of effort around every equinox since September 2017.
“Hopes were wearing thin as we were moving away from the recent equinox on September 23,” he said.
“Even when the path may have been open over the past 3 weeks, either end would be plagued with QRN.”
He said that while the opening that facilitated the record-breaking contact was not comparably as strong
as past openings, “something special was obviously at play.”
The contact covered 9,307.5 miles (14,979 kilometers), topping the previous record of 8,351.9 miles set
by Roger Crofts, VK4YB, and Kenneth Roberson, K5DNL, by nearly 1,000 miles. Tichansky said his transmit
antenna is a 67-foot top-loaded vertical, and the receive antenna is a full-sized eight-circle array
comprised of short verticals. The transmit/receive at VK4YB is a linear-loaded vertical.

— Thanks to Eric Tichansky, NO3M

This concludes this week's bulletin. Does anyone require repeats or clarifications?
Hearing none, This is V__3____ returning the frequency to net control.

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Bulletin sent from Official Bulletin Manager

Posted by: Paul Caccamo <va3pc @ rac.ca>